mustbethrifty house

The batteries are HERE

So I came home on Friday to these babies:

Enphase batteries Enphase batteries are AC-based (rather than DC) and hence integrate really well with our AC microinverter system. It has many pluses, such as compact sizing, modularity and, according to Renew Economy, ‘a depth of discharge greater than 95 per cent, an ambient operating temperature range of -20°C – 45°C and a warranty of up to 10 years or 7300 cycles.’ After 7300 cycles, Cheap Geek expects them to still be operating at 80% capacity.

Install took just over 5 hours (1 hour per battery) and the batteries were charged by the end of the day. We now have somewhere between 5.7 kW and 6 kW to draw from during sunless periods. It’s too early for us to tell whether the batteries will remove our need for coal-powered grid electricity completely, so watch this space…

Footnote Frivolity***, Going Green, mustbethrifty house

Going electric in the garden

Now that we have surplus free clean electricity from our solar panels, it makes sense to power our garden tools with batteries instead of petrol. Cheap Geek took advantage of the Masters fire sale and bought an electric lawnmower and line trimmer. He’s used both a few times now. The mower was used on regularly cut buffalo grass while the trimmer was used on a neighbour’s neglected garden as well as our somewhat neater yard. Here are his thoughts:

LAWNMOWER

The electric lawn mower is quieter and lighter than its petrol equivalent*. It also doesn’t have a pull cord and therefore does not require muscle to start; if you can make a fist with your hand, you can turn it on. Cleaning is easier too: no need to worry about petrol leaking or accidentally burning yourself against a hot engine.

The height adjuster on the electric mower is not as fine as the old petrol mower, but it is good enough for domestic use on buffalo grass.

LINE TRIMMER

The electric line trimmer is also quiet to use. The noise mainly comes from the sound of the trimmer line hitting the grass. It is, however, heavier than petrol models due to the weight of the battery. This particular model comes with a shoulder strap, which can take some of the load off the arms when necessary.

AND ANOTHER THING

The batteries provided ample juice for our block (and some of the neighbour’s garden as well), and you can buy bigger batteries where needed. When the batteries run out, the tool just stops; there is no noticeable decline in power before this happens. Recharging takes about 1 to 1.5 hours, and should be done while the sun is shining.

Our old petrol garden tools are still in good working order. My dad gave these to us when we first moved into the Mustbethrifty House; they were old models that he had repaired/serviced. Dad will be taking these back and sending them onto family who don’t have solar panels. I’m not sure what to do with the jerrycan though.

jerrycan


* ‘The average gas powered lawn mower is approximately 90 dB…these cordless mowers are almost 100 times less noisy compared to the gas mower’ (Todd Fratzel from Toolbox Buzz on ‘Best Cordless Lawn Mower – Head to Head Comparison’).

Going Green, mustbethrifty house

From gas to all-electric to solar

Ripping out the gas meter was logistically unfun. It took many phone calls, emails, and Facebook complaints before my gas provider figured out that I didn’t want to disconnect from the electricity grid (I don’t even have an electricity account with them) and that I just wanted a Victorian Gas Abolishment Form. My gas provider also tried to tell me that meter removal would cost upwards of $500, when, in reality, it cost under $60. I’m not sure why it was so difficult for customer service to action my request. Maybe gas meter removal is still too rare an occurrence? Maybe other folks who switch to all-electric keep their gas meter and continue to pay their service-to-property charges?

Anyway, the gas is gone and good riddance.

gas meter
Our last gas meter reading

Meanwhile, winter has come; we’re cranking up the main split-system in the living areas for a couple of hours on most nights, and sticking to these areas. In the morning, our bedroom split-system turns on briefly to help us get out of bed. It’s really, really cold in the bathroom, now that there’s no ducted heating coming out of the vents. (Note to self: must get onto draft-proofing and double glazing this room.) Cheap Geek has timed the hot water to turn on during the middle of the day, in anticipation of free solar-generated electricity. And I’m getting used to cooking on the induction stovetop.

During this period of all-electric (no gas consumption), we used an average of 9.84 kilowatt-hours per day (20/5/16-5/8/16), compared to last year’s average of 5.63 kilowatt-hours per day (20/5/15-5/8/15) when we were using gas for heating/cooling, stovetop cooking, and hot water.Satellite dish

While waiting for the solar panel install, we had some roof maintenance done. The work is guaranteed for ten years, which hopefully means no solar panels will need to be removed during this period. Cheap Geek and my dad also took away the unused satellite dish that was bolted to the chimney; it would have been extremely hard to remove the dish with solar panels underfoot!

Thirty-two solar panels (Q.PRO-G4 265) were installed over three days. Due to our roof orientation and overshadowing in summer, Cheap Geek opted for microinverters instead of the traditional centralised inverter. There was the option of having a central inverter with power optimisers; these work better at extreme temperatures (i.e. warmer climes) and are the more cost effective option in commercial/larger arrays. However, we live in Melbourne and have a domestic system. Cheap Geek also preferred the safety of AC current running across the roof.

The panels started generating electricity on 6/8/16. So far, they’re pumping out anything between 4.19 to 27.3 kilowatt-hours. We haven’t got batteries yet so we are still drawing power from the grid between dusk and dawn, an average of 5.04 kilowatt-hours which is almost a 50% reduction in grid-electricity consumption. It also brings our grid-electricity consumption below what we were using in 2015, which means that our solar array is offsetting all of our energy needs for heating/cooling, stovetop cooking, and hot water.IMG_0016.JPG

Footnote Frivolity***, Going Green

Goodbye gas, we’re NOT going to miss you (part 2)

Last week, I posted my thoughts on not cooking with gas. This week, I’m going discuss our experiences with 2 more gas to electric appliance conversions:

HEATING AND COOLING

Before: 1980s Vulcan gas ducted heating, 2 x Chigo reverse-cycle heating and cooling, 1 x portable fan

After: 2 x Daikin reverse-cycle units, 1 x portable oil heater, 1 x portable fan

Tradie costs: $325 (electrician) and $200-400 (installation of reverse-cycle units)

In the past, the gas ducted heating provided heat indiscriminately to all corners of the house. The temperature gauge wasn’t very sensitive so the house was either freezing or balmy. The gas ducted heating also had to be turned on and off manually, so we usually left it running all night. On hot days, we tried to use the portable fan, reserving the power-suck of an old reverse-cycle unit in the lounge on unbearably hot days.

April and May 2016 have been unseasonably warm, but we’ve managed to get by with a programmed 30 minute burst of heat from the bedroom’s new reverse-cycle unit first thing in the morning and manually turning on the heat in the lounge room on the occasional nippy night. The air from the reverse-cycle unit that we’ve purchased is fairly dry, but I’ve figured out a setting which allows the unit not to blow air directly into my face. Hurrah for instruction manuals.

We only get energy-efficient heating in our bedroom and the living space, so we will probably need to use the portable oil heater in other rooms if it gets too cold, but at least we now effectively have ‘zoned’ heating.

In regards to cooling, it’s early days yet, but I’m hoping our newer, more energy-efficient units provide better bang per buck/kilowatt as well as better standby power consumption. I’m also hoping that our behaviour doesn’t change (i.e. going to town on the reverse-cycle cooling use).

HOT WATER

gas water heater

Before: Vulcan gas water heater

After: Sanden heat-pump

Tradie costs: $325 (electricians) and $1190 (plumber)*

Like many Melbourne homes, ours came with a gas water heater. I don’t have much to say about it. It was reliable and quiet, I guess.

Most people think of putting in electric-boosted solar hot water as the only greener option, but heat-pump technology (the stuff used in fridges and air-conditioners) is much more reliable than solar hot water in cooler climes (i.e. Hobart). It’s very efficient, and frees up roof-space for more solar panels.

We’ve opted for the Sanden heat-pump because it can be programmed to not draw power at certain periods of day (i.e. the middle of the night, when the ambient temperature is coolest). It’s very quiet, much quieter than a water pump or an air conditioner. It also needs only three hours to completely heat up a 315L tank. And, this is going to sound crazy, it only needed 15 minutes run-time before we got some running hot water!**

Cheap Geek has been monitoring our our electricity consumption and the heat pump seems to only use 400-500 watts per half hour.

The main thing I have against the new heat-pump is its footprint is much bigger than the old gas water heater. You will need to set aside room for the heat-pump as well as the tank, so it’s not a viable option if outdoor space is premium. The pump also needs electricity, which may not be readily available, especially if the previous water heater ran on gas (the joys of renovation logistics).


*These costs are offset in part by the government’s small-scale technology certificate (aka rebate).
**The installers who had not seen a heat-pump before were skeptical until they stuck their hand under the tap in the laundry.

Footnote Frivolity***, Going Green, mustbethrifty house, Reviews, Uncategorized

Goodbye gas, we’re NOT going to miss you (part 1)

Over the Christmas break, Cheap Geek spent a lot of time crunching numbers. He downloaded a year’s worth of electricity usage data from the power company, poured over utilities bills, and trawled through solar panel specs in an attempt to determine the whens and hows of breaking even with solar panel technology. At the end of it, he figured that

  • it would take us 9.5 to 10 years to recoup the initial estimated outlay*;
  • based on our consumption patterns, we could only achieve this if we also installed battery technology; and
  • getting rid of gas would effectively pay for 80% of the solar panels within ten years.

This project was of immense interest to him, so much so that he spent much of the next few months telling everyone and anyone about the financial merits of switching over to solar power. He even convinced my dad, a big Liberal, no-Greens-hogwash supporter, that solar power plus batteries was the way to go.

As of this Thursday, we are officially gas appliance free. These last couple of months have been a frenetic mess of tradesmen replacing gas hot water, gas ducted heating, and gas stove with reverse-cycle heating and cooling, induction stove, and hot water heat pump. Apart from reverse-cycle cooling, most of these technologies are still as fresh as the fresh air fanned out of a heat pump (brrrrr), and the average John Smith/Jane Doe might feel uncomfortable adopting them. Ripping out the gas stove sounded particularly traumatic to some of our acquaintances (especially the wok-loving ones)**.

So the rest of this post will be about my thoughts on changing over from various gas to electric appliances, starting with the

STOVE

Disconnected gas stove

Before: Bosch gas cooktop

After: AEG induction cooktop

Tradie costs: $165 (plumber) and $370 (electrician)

As per above, switching over from gas cooking to induction is the greatest mental hurdle. Cooking is so very personal and seeing flames lick the sides of a pot must fulfil some Neanderthal need within us. I’ve even had greenies ask me whether I miss my stovetop or not.

FYI: I don’t use a wok much as it is not conducive to batch cooking. I usually cook casserole-style dishes, soups, and roasts. I’ve just newly discovered pressure cooking, which really suits my one-pot mindset (less pots to clean) and doesn’t even require a stove. When  I do use the induction stove, I use it to make sauces, soups, stews. I fry eggs sunny side up, make an omelet, boil water/stock, cook meat.

What I love about the induction stove is the evenness and control. It is superior to gas when needing to cook food at low temperatures: heating milk, cooking eggs and fish. Sausages also cook more evenly.

The AEG stove that we bought also has some fancy eco functions. For instance, it will tell you if you can use the residual heat on the stove as a ‘keep warm’ function, and it can turn off power to an element just before the end of a timed cook, using the residual heat to continue cooking the food.

What I find hard to adjust to is the speed in which a pan will heat up. You can’t leave an empty pan heating on the stove (I manage to burn butter for the first time by heating up an empty saucepan and then dropping the butter into it). This could be overcome by using a heavy cast iron pot; these take much longer to heat up than my Baccarat Bio+***.

There also is a lot more steam produced; you can’t cook without turning on the exhaust fan. And you need to hold onto your lightweight pans when stirring the pot, so that the pans don’t move around, scratching the cooktop surface. Regular cleaning is also important: the bases of pots and pans need to be properly cleaned of grime/residue and the cooktop needs to be wiped down with a soft, damp cloth after each use.

In the next post, I’ll talk about our experience with reverse-cycle heating and cooling, and hot water heat pumps.


*This estimated outlay included new energy-efficient electric appliances, solar panels, batteries, electrical work to get solar power ready, plumber work needed for the removal of all gas appliances, and various installation costs.

**It didn’t take too long for me to find a new home for the gas stove, whereas the gas hot water and gas ducted heating seem destined for the scrap heap.

***You may need to upgrade your pots/pans if you don’t already own induction-compatible ones.

Going Green, mustbethrifty house

Invisible pelmets

Waaay back in March 2015, I expressed the need to retrofit pelmets to ‘reduce heat loss/gain from thermal convection’.

Matching fabric pelmets were not an option since the curtains I had purchased were secondhand. I could make my own discreet pelmets but the thought of looking up at a bit of plastic sarking every time I pulled back the curtains gave me the heebie-jeebies. Instead, I’ve held out, putting up with the heat/cold, and stayed on the lookout for a real Harry-Potter-and-the-Deathly-Hallows-style invisible pelmet.

Ecomaster sells a made-to-order invisible pelmet for $16 per metre. Basically, it is a piece of clear plastic which balances on top of the curtain rail/track and window frame.

I’ve bought one to try and am pretty happy with my purchase. My curtains still open and close unimpeded. Looking up, there’s a little bit of reflection and overhang:

invisible plastic pelmets from EcoMaster

And there is some glare above the pelmet:

glare from invisible pelmet
I really am nitpicking however. The pelmet is barely noticeable. And unlike fabric pelmets, it should be easy to keep clean. Yay to mostly invisible pelmets!

Footnote Frivolity***, Gardening on a Budget, Going Green, mustbethrifty house, Second-hand Scavengers

Planning, planting, & waiting for the harvest

While home improvements have limped along at the rate of our mortgage-handicapped savings accounts, the garden around our new home has flourished. Water-tanks are the main bit of hardscaping. However, we have also put in some Colourbond-and-rescued-cypress garden beds, constructed by a local up in Hurstbridge.

DSC00325

And I’ve saved the neighbour’s broken pavers, turning them into a garden path.

DSC00431

More importantly, I’ve been adding as many perennial edibles as I can. It started with turning an ivy-infested patch into a herb garden and ended with me feverishly researching every and any edible plant that might survive in Melbourne. Quandong, anyone?

The plants we have so far includes:

 …almond, apple, artichoke, asparagus, avocado, basil (perennial), beans (runner, and butter), blackberry (thornless), blueberries, cape gooseberry, caper bush, celery (wild), Chilean guava, chives, choko, cranberry, elderberry, fennel, fig, garlic, greenfeast peas, horseradish, kiwiberry, lemon verbena, lemon, lemongrass, lettuce, lime, marjoram, midyim berry, mint (Vietnamese fish, Vietnamese hot, common, and apple), native ginger, nectareze, onion (spring, Egyptian walking), orange, oregano, parsley (curly-leaf), passionfruit, pepino, pepperberry, pomegranate, potato, radishes, rhubarb, rosemary, sage (pineapple, common), salad burnett, samphire, strawberries (alpine and normal), summer squash, tea camellia, thyme, tomatoes…

 Most of these plants are nursery-bought*, a few have come from veggie-swaps. The fig is one of Dad’s strikings.

I’ve tried positioning plants based on their needs. For instance, the orange and the lime has been placed against a north-facing fence**, whilst the cranberry is partly shaded and receiving the occasional deluge from a downpipe. Working with nature, instead of against it, means less watering, fertilising, and need for pest-control. In other words, a garden that is less resource-hungry.

Years will pass before we bring in a decent harvest: the antithesis of today’s have-it-now culture. It’s definitely a bit of wishin’ and hopin’ in a My Best Friends’ WeddingVeggie Garden kind of way.


*Note to self: must learn how to strike cuttings, etc.

*We had to remove a unruly neighbours-be-gone hedge first. I’m looking forward to planting out the rest of our food hedge.