Going Green, Thriftster weddings

The cost of acceding to other people’s expectations

001133Cheap Geek and I had initially planned on paperless wedding invites to cut down on financial and environmental costs. We had already secured our domain name, something that was sufficiently geektastic, when I told my parents what we were thinking.

The wedding website didn’t go down well. It wasn’t baby boomer friendly enough: not everyone had access to email. My parents’ concerns were reasonable so we opted for what another thrifster couple did Continue reading

Gen DIY-er, Reviews, Thriftster weddings

Ahead of its time: The DIY Wedding

The DIY Wedding: Celebrate Your Day Your WayThere’s something contradictory about a generic instruction manual espousing ‘celebrat[ing]…your day your way’. Nevertheless, props must be given to a DIY wedding how-to that was published ahead of its time in 2007, before the global financial meltdown turned thrifster DIY into hipster cool*. Props must also be given to the author, Kelly Bare, and her publisher, Chronicle Books, for creating a wedding book that has yet to date. This is achieved in part by a lack of photos (though the website references and pink, blue and cream colour scheme will eventually need a refresh) and a back-to-basics approach. Continue reading

Dress to Impress (for Less), Thriftster weddings

Secondhand dressed

The other day, I eavesdropped on a conversation between two mothers. One was telling the other how hard it was to find a decent wedding dresses for under a thousand bucks. Yep, it’s common knowledge that wedding dresses are expensive, a fact that the wedding industry tries to perpetuate with its talk of ‘couture’, ‘bespoke’, and ‘chantilly lace’.

For a mustbethrifty bride, however, the wedding dress is an opportunity for some genuine savings. Unless you DIY, it’s hard to skimp on food, drinks, and entertainment, whereas it’s relatively easy to be parsimonious with wedding dresses, especially if you’re not afraid to wear something secondhand.It also makes sense. I MEAN, IT MIGHT BE A ONCE-IN-A-LIFETIME DRESS, BUT YOU’RE ONLY GOING TO WEAR IT ONCE, SO WHY SPEND HUNDREDS/THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS ON IT IF YOU’RE ONLY GOING TO WEAR IT ONCE…YOU’RE PLANNING ON WEARING IT ONLY ONCE, RIGHT? Continue reading

Dress to Impress (for Less), Gen DIY-er, Thriftster weddings

Shoe bling

Need some fancy-schmancy shoes for a special occasion? Instead of buying a new pair, why not invest in some shoe bling?

Thanks to the T-bar design, I’m able to add some sparkle to my ballroom shoes with brooches from Diva:

For T-bar-less shoes, try shoe clips from eBay or Etsy.

If brooches and shoe clips are too big an investment, make your own shoe bling. Continue reading

Dress to Impress (for Less), Gen DIY-er, Thriftster weddings

Improv, 1940s style

I read somewhere that I should be treating this wedding as a chance to learn new skills. While most DIY types take on this opportunity to learn the art of floral arrangement or how to crochet wedding toppers, I thought I’d spend my time (and mullah) learning how to do my own hair and makeup*. After all, isn’t that what Kate Middleton did?

Chrissy Keepence from the Lindy Charm School For Girls has been helping ladies achieve vintage glamour for years; I was fortunate enough to attend her three-hour workshop at the Vintage Emporium in Tyabb. Most of the three hours were dedicated to pincurls, victory rolls, do-rags, and snoods, but Miss Chrissy also spent some time demonstrating 1940s makeup and the importance of structured undergarments.

What I love about the 1940s is how natural and versatile the makeup is. The only ‘pop’ of colour is the red lipstick, allowing ladies to go from day to night, casual to glam without needing to alter their look or rely on a multitude of products. Super Kawaii Mama’s Candice DeVille has made an excellent video putting together the look:

Continue reading

Reviews, Thriftster weddings

Let’s make it personal: Offbeat Bride (2nd edition)

Most how-tos read like recipes, deconstructing the Heston’s Feast that is a wedding into the main ingredients, dumbing it down for homely brides-to-be who just want to recreate a traditional dish. Catherine Yarnovich Risling’s Pretty Weddings for Practically Pennies is one such book: a series of craft projects, including place-card holders, boutonnieres, and confetti cones. Kelly Bare’s The DIY Wedding: Celebrate Your Day Your Way is another, giving lip-service to the personal touch with little personality between its covers.

Attempting to ‘encourage contemporary brides to feel good about their less-than-traditional wedding choices’, Ariel Meadow Stallings’ Offbeat Bride: Creative Alternatives for Independent Brides, on the other hand, is autobiographical. Continue reading